“God With Us”

My favourite Christmas-related word is Immanuel (or Emmanuel, depending on the translation you’re reading), which means “God with us.” Some people make the mistake of thinking it means “God is with us”—a statement that is true, of course, but has a slightly different meaning.

When Jesus Christ was born, He was God…with us. I love that! It reminds me that not only is God always with us in spirit, but in the person of Jesus He was also with us in physical form. Jesus was and is God. He came and dwelt among us here on earth, participating in the journey of human life as we know it. Yes, God is the eternal, infinite creator of the universe who is too great for our minds and eyes to be able to handle. And yet He is familiar with even the tiniest aspects of our lives.

This is what makes Christmas, as we call it, significant to me. God could have sent His Son as a grown man, as a majestic king, as a great warrior, at an appointed time to come to earth and do what He had to do. But He chose to be born as a baby and go through all the undignified experiences of childhood and adolescence and young adulthood for 30 years before starting His ministry. How beautiful and humbling that He chose to know us so intimately.

“Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign: The virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel.” – Isaiah 7:14

I pray that, as you prepare for your Christmas celebrations, you will reflect on and be encouraged by thoughts of Immanuel. Jesus is God…with you. ♥

Immanuel
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